Annie Sloan Chalk Paint & Decoupage

On the weekend I decided it was time to start a project. I was supposed to head to the Barossa Valley to the lovely Brocante in the Barossa for an Annie Sloan Chalk Paint workshop on Saturday, but my type 1 diabetes had other ideas. I had a terrible night and so was very washed out and did not want to make the drive out there. Instead I took it fairly easy although I did manage to get a garage sale in!

On Sunday I decided that as I had not worked with decoupage for a while I would have a trial run of using the chalk paint with decoupage on our deck table, which has seen better days. It used to be our inside table and eventually was too small so we moved it outdoors. It has been exposed to weather, kids, cats and paint! As it is our outdoor table, I was not too fussed how it turned out and used the project as a way to get back into the work.

Here it is before!

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A lovely patina!

 

Ready to go with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Old White

Ready to go with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Old White

With Annie Sloan, there really is no need to do any preparation. I would usually sand back any rough areas if painting furniture but with this paint there really is no need, so I dived straight in with the Old White to start with.

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As with any painting, it is good to work in different directions rather than just one, it gives a better finish to the paint

Painting every which way! You can also stipple (dab with the brush) if you want an effective aged look

Painting every which way! You can also stipple (dab with the brush) if you want an effective aged look

First coat complete!

First coat complete!

I am a painter of pictures as well and love to work with pastel, oils and acrylics. I have also done my fair share of painting furniture, kitchen cupboards and a variety of other objects over my life and I can agree with many, that this Chalk Paint is beautiful to work with. For an impatient person like myself it is so easy but even more importantly, it is smooth and creamy to work with and can be used for so many purposes.

Drying time, I deliberately left the bottom and the legs as I just wanted to distress them a little at the end

Drying time, I deliberately left the bottom and the legs as I just wanted to distress them a little at the end

Next I decided that I wanted to decoupage the top – it is something I used to love to do and took classes with one of  my best friends the lovely Denice, who passed away this year, so I thought it was time I got back into it. I found some lovely pieces of paper art which were sent to me by some artists I supported earlier this year from Tassie. I laid them out to look at pattern initially looking at this square cross idea to start with.

I liked the mix of colours

I liked the mix of colours

I was still not sure of the layout but got started with the paint. I decided to add some Duckegg Blue as I love this colour tone. I mixed some Old White, to make it a bit lighter than the original colour.

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Duck Egg Blue, mixed with Old White

I then saw that some of the old acrylic paint splashes on the table had come through in a cracked way (which I kinda liked as part of the aged look!) but decided to sand back a bit.

I could have just left these depending on the finish I wanted

I could have just left these depending on the finish I wanted but sanded them back a bit

On with the blue mix!

On with the blue mix!

nearly there

nearly there

The blue layer is complete

The blue layer is complete

I deliberately left the edges rough, to give that shabby feel. If I was just doing the chalk paint, this it the point at which I would use the wax. If you have not used Annie Sloan Chalk Paint before this is an important step and you can use the wax in a variety of ways to create different finishes. As I was planning to decoupage and varnish over that I left the waxing at this stage.

Leaving the edges shabby

Leaving the edges shabby!

I was not happy with the squares alone and with this being a circular table decided to take a different approach. I have a stack of pictures and you can use card, magazines, anything really that you can lay your hands on, for decoupage pieces. I decided on this beautiful piece from one of my Frankie Mags as the centrepiece of the table and wanted to create a fun talking piece for the kids when we are sitting eating dinner on the deck.

Decoupage basically means to cut out—it is a craft or art form that involves pasting cut-outs (usually paper) to an object and then covering them with several coats of varnish or lacquer.  It leaves the flat images looking like they have more depth and makes patterns and pictures look as though they are actually painted on the decoupaged object. Decoupage is a fun and easy way to decorate just about any object, including household items from small vases to large pieces of furniture–the possibilities are endless. Best of all, decoupage can be learned fairly quickly in just a few steps.

The centre image for my decouapage, laying it out

The centre image for my decouapage, laying it out

The next step is to glue the pieces on. I remembered that when I used to do a lot of decoupage, I had a small rubber roller I used to ensure no air bubbles without damaging the delicate paper cut outs but I could not lay my hands on it, so went without it. You can use just about any materials for decoupage, including cards, tissue paper, wrapping paper, paper shopping bags, magazine clippings, rice paper, thin fabric pieces, or (of course) specially made decoupage paper.

Putting on the glue

Putting on the glue

There are a range of glues you could use. I am going to head to a craft store to get some supplies as I am planning to do a lot more of this work again, but I just went to Mitre 10 and grabbed some craft glue.

Craft Glue

Craft Glue

Next I laid out the pretty squares to work out a kind of placemat, flag effect. I wanted it to be fairly even without seeming overly “perfect”.

Laying out the next stage

Laying out the next stage

I really love the blend of colours on the blue, it is like a patchwork quilt

I really love the blend of colours on the blue, it is like a patchwork quilt

 

Gluing each square

Gluing each square

Now comes the varnish. Again you can buy specially made decoupage varnish but as I couldn’t be bothered finding a craft store open, I went with a couple of types of varnish from Mitre 10. You need to apply at least 3 – 5 coats depending on how thick the pieces are underneath and what you are using the object for. Once the coat is dry, apply the next. After a couple of layers give it a light sand. I have to do another coat or two yet.

I looked for clear varnish which is water wash up

I looked for clear varnish which is water wash up

The first coat of varnish is on

The first coat of varnish is on

Now I was ready to add paint to the base, legs and rim and decided to take a rustic approach, using very little paint on the brush so as to give that shabby chic feel and the wood was showing through. I liked that the feet on the legs had the original stain rubbing off and took advantage of that.

Painting the base

Painting the base

Loving this look

Loving this look

I like the way it has come together - a unique piece that is all my own!

I like the way it has come together – a unique piece that is all my own!

Finally I used the soft wax now on the legs, base and rim. Once dry I buffed this and it is pretty much all done! I may still add  a couple more coats of varnish this weekend as I would like a little more depth. But it is feeling pretty smooth and durable at the moment.

Annie Sloan clear wax

Annie Sloan soft wax

After a wax, it is hard to notice in the shot but it gives a sheen

After a wax, it is hard to notice in the shot but it gives a sheen

A nice day's work :)

A nice day’s work 🙂

Oh and while waiting for coats to dry and to use the left over paint, I decided to whip a coat onto this ladder for an inside piece. 🙂 I have also started on the chairs on the deck, which I will follow up with later.

Have you tried Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and/or Decoupage? I would love to hear from you and see some of what you are doing too!

Helen

xx

Making use of the paint!

Making use of the paint!

I love this little ladder :)

I love this little ladder 🙂

Taking a rustic approach again

Taking a rustic approach again

I used very little paint on the brush

I used very little paint on the brush

Nearly ready to wax

Nearly ready to wax

All done :)

All done 🙂

11 Comments

  1. Helen wilde on November 5, 2013 at 11:18 am

    Brilliant! looks fantastic, sounds like a good process.Thanks for sharing.

    • Helen Edwards on November 11, 2013 at 9:20 pm

      welcome I had a great time!

  2. Sean on May 12, 2014 at 3:35 am

    Hi there, great table!

    Can I ask, did you decoupage directly onto the chalk paint (once dry)? Or apply the wax first, then decoupage? I’m looking at doing something similar.

    Many thanks

    • Helen Edwards on May 12, 2014 at 8:20 am

      Hi Sean, thank you! I painted the chalk paint first, then decoupaged and as I was then using varnish for the decouapage, I did not wax at all on the top. I did wax the legs etc good luck with your project!

  3. kathysu67914449 on April 29, 2015 at 12:21 am

    Wow what a great piece can’t wait to try on kitchen table !    Just found this site so happy with it and thanks for sharing!!!

    • Helen Edwards on April 30, 2015 at 6:00 am

      thank you! Let me know how you go!

  4. Recycled_Interiors on September 27, 2015 at 5:03 pm

    kathysu67914449 thank you for visiting! I look forward to sharing more with you 🙂

  5. Racheal on January 2, 2017 at 6:49 am

    Hi
    I have painted a chest of drawers in chalk paint and decoupaged a few flowers from a napkin.
    The glue has made the paint look darker and I am not sure what to do next.
    Do I varnish the whole drawer and wax the rest of the unit or varnish the whole lot.
    Please can you help x

    • Helen Edwards on January 4, 2017 at 7:13 am

      Hi Racheal – how much darker is it? And what glue did you use? It may change if you wax and sand as a test but you want to be very gentle over the flowers with the sanding and use a very fine sandpaper. Another option would be to deliberately do a heavier distress to make the surface less perfect overall – it is a bit hard to see without a picture – do you have one to share? x

  6. Caroline Zani on January 26, 2017 at 12:03 am

    Hi! I came across this just now as I was trying to figure out what when wrong with my first attempt at image transfer. Do you have experience with it? I used mod podge with a script I printed from my ink jet printer ( as instructed on another site ). I left it overnight and followed the steps of adding a little water to the paper and rubbing it away. The paper came up but the mod podge was thick and white around the image. As I tried to wipe it away – off came the ink! Ugh! Any suggestions?

    • Helen Edwards on February 3, 2017 at 10:02 am

      Hi Caroline – thanks for your message 🙂 Did you make the mod podge or buy it? It is possible there was too much applied and it leaked around the edges of the transfer which will then set in the way you described. If that happens, wipe it away so it does not dry there.

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